ALUMNA DESIGNATES ANTIOCH COLLEGE IN HER WILL TO INVEST IN THE FUTURE


Joyce Oelschlager Idema ’57 followed her high school friend, Gretchen Reinke Price ’57, to Antioch College from Minnesota and found a great fit. “I was from a small town, and at Antioch I got to see the world.”

Joyce has made a generous commitment to Antioch College in her will—a gift of her home in Santa Fe, New Mexico. She had already named Antioch as a beneficiary of her IRA, and added the gift of her home to ensure that she took full advantage of the ways she could provide for Antioch through estate planning.

She explains, “I’m grateful to Antioch and what it stands for. Antioch College was life-changing. I contribute each year, but I also decided to leave my home to Antioch in my will.”

“A gift of real estate is a very generous way of giving back through one’s estate. Gifts such as Joyce’s leave a lasting legacy for generations to come,” says Karen Sieber, major gifts officer at Antioch College. “We are thrilled, honored, and grateful. Estate gifts make a tremendous difference to Antioch’s future.”

Joyce served two terms on the alumni board and was asked to be on the first interim board of trustees when Antioch was re-organizing. She remains on the board of trustees and is an active, committed member of the Antioch family.



ALUMNUS GIVES BACK TO ANTIOCH WITH IRA CHARITABLE ROLLOVER TO SUPPORT "COLLEGE OF DISTINCTION"

Dr. Irwin "Pomey" Pomerantz '57 was so set on his decision to attend Antioch College that it was the only place where he applied for admission. "I learned much about the college from two then-enrolled students in my hometown on Long Island," he says. "I preferred an out-of-town school and thought the possibility of co-op work experience in different aspects of chemistry could help in making career choices."

In thanks for the education that led to his successful and rewarding career, Dr. Pomerantz gives back to Antioch through the IRA charitable rollover. "I became interested in contributing via a qualified charitable distribution from my IRA after I had to begin taking required minimum distributions from it," he says. "I was attracted to this idea because such donations benefit the donor as well as the charitable institution."

Dr. Pomerantz says that he'd like to see Antioch again become known as a college of distinction, with emphasis on experiential learning and challenging and wide-ranging academic offerings —with student involvement in policy-making and pioneering in consideration of new ways of learning at the college level. "If alumni see the 'spark' of something vital being incubated or actually being implemented at Antioch," he concludes, "then they should find some way to contribute to the College in its rebirth and development."



LEGACY SOCIETY AT ANTIOCH COLLEGE HONORS HUGH TAYLOR BIRCH, CLASS OF 1869, AND HIS GIFTS OF GLEN HELEN NATURE PRESERVE AND ENDOWMENT

Hugh Taylor Birch (Class of 1869) was passionate about both nature and his alma mater, Antioch College. His passions were rooted in the rich soil of the Glen, the land adjacent to the Antioch College campus on which he grew up.

Birch’s father was friends with Horace Mann and moved his family to Yellow Springs from Massachusetts so that his children could take advantage of Mann’s new educational vision. Young Birch then grew up in the shadow of Antioch Towers and was educated at the village common school and the Antioch Preparatory Academy. The principal of the Academy was Edward Orton, who instilled in Birch a deep love of nature. They spent countless hours together exploring the Glen. Later, Orton became a Geology professor at Antioch College and eventually President from 1872-1873.

As a student at Antioch, Birch organized and captained the 1869 baseball team which, as the story goes, bested the Cincinnati Red Stockings.  He organized a dramatics club and played Petruccio in Shakespeare’s Taming of the Shrew. He was one course shy of graduation when he left Antioch to study law in Chicago. Years later, Antioch gave him his diploma — not just an honorary degree.

Birch married and had three children, practiced law, and became General Counsel to Rockefeller’s Standard Oil. His fortune, however, was the result of his work as a real estate developer. And, although law and real estate sustained him financially, he took his greatest pleasures in nature, where he found strength and renewal of his spirit in the woods.

Shortly after his daughter Helen’s untimely passing from cancer, Birch gave the land that was the Glen to the College in 1929, which was then named in her honor as the Glen Helen Nature Preserve. Subsequently, in 1943 Antioch received from Birch’s estate a $1 million endowment gift (which more than doubled the size of the endowment) and another $500,000 to help maintain Glen Helen. (In today’s dollars these gifts would total $20.4 million.) Birch’s generous gifts would ensure that the Glen would be enjoyed by generations of Antiochians and other visitors for generations to come.

To honor Mr. Birch’s transformational gifts to Antioch College, including quite possibly the College’s first-ever estate gift, the College long ago named the legacy giving society in his honor.


If you would like to leave a lasting legacy that will benefit Antioch College students for generations to come, we’d like to talk with you. Please contact Susanne Hashim, Vice President for Advancement, at (937) 319-0163 or shashim@antiochcollege.edu.